Tag Archives: Robert D. Putnam

Bowling Alone – the revival of community and its challenge to religion.

Putnam’s book is a detailed and systematic study of the rise and fall of social capital and civic engagement throughout the 20th century, and the possibly reasons and factors behind this fall. His basic premise is this: since the 1960’s … Continue reading

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Commuting and suburbs negatively affects civic engagement

Is increased movement and suburbanization to blame for the falling rates of civic engagement, including church-going? In the USA, Robert Putnam suggests that the amount people move cannot be held responsible because ‘mobility has not increased at all over the … Continue reading

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Are parents predisposed to think about God?

In Bowling Alone, Robert Putnam describes the general decline in civic involvement in the US during the 20th century. Since the early 1970s, across the board, less people are members of clubs and societies, church groups, political organisations than before. … Continue reading

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Different Types of community involvement

I’m reading Robert D. Putnam’s book Bowling Alone, which seems to be the most detailed study of community involvement in the US in the 20th Century. He charts many areas of civic life where engagement is on the wane. I … Continue reading

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Wuthnow on church impact on society

Robert Wuthnow quoted in Bowling Alone by Robert D. Putnam Religion may have a salutary effect on civil society by encouraging its member to worship, to spend time with their families, and to learn the moral lessons embedded in religious … Continue reading

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